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  • White Burgundy

    What you need to know Part of the backbone of France, the Burgundy region runs from North to South, along the Saône river. Burgundy is split into many, highly fragmented, appellations, many of which we know almost like a brand. Some areas command sky high prices and their neighbours a fraction – it’s all about the name! The wines are almost all made with Chardonnay but they differ due to climate, vineyard position and winemaking. Classification...

  • White Rioja

    ...eflect the popularity of zesty Sauvignon Blanc. They can be lovely and thirst quenching. Make sure you’re buying White Rioja made with 100% Viura grape, it will often be marked ‘joven’ (young) because it hasn’t been oak aged. The foot in both camps isn’t quite that but is a newer fresher style of White Rioja, which is rich and tropical with a gentle spiciness. It is more full bodied than the new ‘joven’ style but much fruitier than the old style....

  • Red Burgundy

    What you need to know Red Burgundy is made up of the Pinot Noir grape and share a lighter body than many reds. The wines have a fragrant raspberry and redcurrant flavour although many of them also have an earthiness (in some cases almost farmyardy) which is not loved by all, but very typical. There are a multitude of appellations within Red Burgundy from plain ‘Bourgogne’ to Grand Cru Montrachet. The classification is geographical and refers to...

  • White Zinfandel

    ...wine drinking with this because it is so easy going. Add lemonade, ice or anything else. Despite its popularity White Zinfandel is sniffed at in wine drinking circles. Originally you found White Zinfandel from California but now there are lots of imitations all over the world.   Top tip – unless you like really sweet wines then move on to one of the other rosés. It does have some potential matching spicy food particularly chicken tikka....

  • A rich and robust red wine tasting

    ...r highlight for me was the seafood cocktail with capers and lemon, served on a razor clam shell to pair with the White Burgundy – palate cleansers, naturally! Star wines? Well, the thing I love the most is that whilst there are often shared favourites everyone’s preference is different. The Riojas did win overall in the end with the Viña Albina Gran Reserva 1998 getting the most votes, followed by the Finca Manzanos.  I have to say the Viña Albin...

  • White Central

  • Comfort food and wines as the clocks go back

    ...ets and have some spicy New World Rosé. Bangers, Mash and Gravy Pie and Mash Chicken and ham or mushroom – both whites and reds make a great accompaniment. You can go very classical and have a glass of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay both Old World style (i.e. Burgundy) or New World (New Zealand and Australia respectively). I’d also be tempted by something Spanish like Rioja, both the red and lesser known white will do the job. Meat Pie – The above mi...

  • Thirsty Thursday Wine Tastings

    ...roduction to the WineTubeMap A whistlestop tour of the WineTubeMap, wine tasting and food matching covering red, white and rose. With bites to match. 3rd May – Aromatic Line An up and coming line with fresh and funky whites for the bank holiday. Some favourite grapes and new favourites on the winelist with some great bites to set them off. 10th May – Red Central Gourmet Tasting Some serious reds from classic regions like the Rhone and Bordeaux &#...

  • Blason de Bourgogne St Veran

    In my quest for great wine under £10 this has to win, it isn’t the most complex or ‘challenging’ white burgundies but it has a sophisticated yet easy going Burgundy, it is creamy and delicious. Great with or without food....

  • New World Pinot Noir

    What you need to know Red Burgundy has a very specific style that New World Pinot Noir seems to flaunt, creating a style of wine that you don’t necessarily need a guidebook with you to understand. Pinot Noir is notoriously difficult to grow, which is why it is far less available (and therefore more expensive) than other grapes. It flourishes in New Zealand, California, Oregon, Australia and the UK in areas or pockets of cool climates. Although s...

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